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Nat Microbiol. 2017 Jan 23;2:16267. doi: 10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.267.

The anti-inflammatory drug mesalamine targets bacterial polyphosphate accumulation.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.
2
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.
4
Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Infectious Diseases &Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.

Abstract

Mesalamine serves as the gold standard in treating ulcerative colitis. However, its precise mechanism(s) of action remains unclear. Here, we show that mesalamine treatment rapidly decreases polyphosphate levels in diverse bacteria, including members of the human gut microbiome. This decrease sensitizes bacteria towards oxidative stress, reduces colonization and attenuates persister cell and biofilm formation, suggesting that mesalamine aids in diminishing the capacity of bacteria to persist within chronically inflamed environments.

PMID:
28112760
PMCID:
PMC5514548
DOI:
10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.267
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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