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Kidney Int. 1989 Oct;36(4):702-6.

Vitamin B6 requirements of patients on chronic peritoneal dialysis.

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1
Nephrology Section, UC Irvine-Long Beach VA Medical Program, California.

Abstract

Patients with chronic renal failure often develop vitamin B6 deficiency, which is of clinical concern because the multiorgan system manifestations are similar to those of uremia. Vitamin B6 deficiency in hemodialysis patients has been previously studied, but the need for daily pyridoxine supplementation in patients on chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) remains unclear. Therefore, we studied a group of 11 stable patients, nine on CAPD and two CCPD, to test for vitamin B6 deficiency and to establish daily requirements. Adequacy of vitamin B6 nutrition was assessed by measurement of plasma and dialysate effluent total vitamin B6 and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the latter using a very sensitive modification of the tyrosine apodecarboxylase enzyme assay. After four weeks without vitamin B6 supplements on a diet containing 1.3 +/- 0.2 mg vitamin B6/day (7.7 +/- 1.2 mumol/day), all patients had subnormal plasma PLP levels, 16 +/- 3 nmol/liter (nml 40 to 60), seven having a severe deficiency (less than or equal to 20 nmol/liter). Plasma total vitamin B6 levels (which includes non-PLP forms of the vitamin) were normal in all patients at baseline, 116 +/- 29 nmol/liter. Peritoneal losses were small, 8 +/- 2 nmol PLP/day and 545 +/- 61 nmol total vitamin B6/day. Supplementation with 5 mg/day oral pyrodoxine HCl for up to 16 weeks adequately repleted eight patients (65 +/- 7 nmol PLP/L), while three patients required 10 mg/day to achieve normal plasma PLP levels. During three episodes of peritonitis, dialysate losses of PLP did not increase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
2811067
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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