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Appl Health Econ Health Policy. 2017 Aug;15(4):455-468. doi: 10.1007/s40258-016-0302-x.

Spectra Optia® for Automated Red Blood Cell Exchange in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance.

Author information

1
Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. iain.willits@nuth.nhs.uk.
2
Regional Medical Physics Department, NICE External Assessment Centre, Freeman Hospital, High Heaton, NE7 7DN, UK. iain.willits@nuth.nhs.uk.
3
Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
4
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, Manchester, UK.
5
York Health Economics Consortium, Enterprise House, Innovation Way, University of York, Heslington, York, UK.

Abstract

The Spectra Optia® automated apheresis system, indicated for red blood cell exchange in people with sickle cell disease, underwent evaluation by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, which uses its Medical Technologies Advisory Committee to make recommendations. The company (Terumo Medical Corporation) produced a submission making a case for adoption of its technology, which was critiqued by the Newcastle and York external assessment centre. Thirty retrospective observational studies were identified in their clinical submission. The external assessment centre considered these were of low methodological and reporting quality. Most were single-armed studies, with only six studies providing comparative data. The available data showed that, compared with manual red blood cell exchange, Spectra Optia reduces the frequency of exchange procedures as well as their duration, but increases the requirement for donor blood. However, other clinical and patient benefits were equivocal because of an absence of robust clinical evidence. The company provided a de novo model to support the economic proposition of the technology, and reported that in most scenarios Spectra Optia was cost saving, primarily through reduced requirement of chelation therapy to manage iron overload. The external assessment centre considered that although the cost-saving potential of Spectra Optia was plausible, the model and its clinical inputs were not sufficiently robust to demonstrate this. However, taking the evidence together with expert and patient advice, the Medical Technologies Advisory Committee considered Spectra Optia was likely to save costs, provide important patient benefits, and reduce inequality, and gave the technology a positive recommendation in Medical Technology Guidance 28.

PMID:
28110486
PMCID:
PMC5506506
DOI:
10.1007/s40258-016-0302-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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