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AIDS Behav. 2018 Mar;22(3):877-886. doi: 10.1007/s10461-017-1685-x.

How Presentation of Drug Detection Results Changed Reports of Product Adherence in South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

Author information

1
University of Zimbabwe-University of California San Francisco Collaborative Research Programme, 15 Phillips, Belgravia, Harare, Zimbabwe. petina@uz-ucsf.co.zw.
2
Women's Global Health Imperative; RTI International, San Francisco, CA, USA.
3
University of Zimbabwe-University of California San Francisco Collaborative Research Programme, 15 Phillips, Belgravia, Harare, Zimbabwe.
4
HIV Prevention Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa.
5
Makerere University-Johns Hopkins University Research Collaboration, Kampala, Uganda.
6
FHI-360, Durham, NC, USA.
7
DAIDS/NIH/NIMH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
8
Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, USA.
9
Population Council, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Accurate estimates of study product use are critical to understanding and addressing adherence challenges in HIV prevention trials. The VOICE trial exposed a significant gap between self-reported adherence and drug detection. The VOICE-D qualitative study was designed to better understand non-adherence during VOICE, and was conducted in 2 stages: before (stage 1) and after (stage 2) drug detection results were provided to participants. Transcripts from 44 women who participated in both stages were analysed to understand the effect of presenting drug detection data on narratives of product use. Thirty-six women reported high adherence in stage 1, yet admitted non-use in stage 2, three reported high adherence in both stages (contrary to their drug detection results) and five had consistent responses across both stages and drug results. Presenting objective measures of use may facilitate more accurate product use reporting and should be evaluated in future prevention trials.

KEYWORDS:

Adherence measures; Drug detection results; HIV prevention; Microbicides; Pre-exposure prophylaxis

PMID:
28110473
PMCID:
PMC5587392
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-017-1685-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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