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Arch Virol. 2017 Jan 21. doi: 10.1007/s00705-017-3222-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Functional effector memory T cells contribute to protection from superinfection with heterologous simian immunodeficiency virus or simian-human immunodeficiency virus isolates in Chinese rhesus macaques.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Medical Biology, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Kunming, China.
  • 2Key Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology and Technology, College of Life Sciences, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin, 300071, China.
  • 3Key Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology and Technology, College of Life Sciences, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin, 300071, China. yueli@nankai.edu.cn.
  • 4Institute of Medical Biology, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Kunming, China. longdingl@gmail.com.

Abstract

Many studies have revealed a protective effect of infection of an individual with an immunodeficiency virus against subsequent infection with a heterologous strain. However, the extent of protection against superinfection conferred by the first infection and the biological consequences of superinfection are not well understood. Here, we report that a rhesus monkey model of mucosal superinfection was established to investigate the protective immune response. Protection against superinfection was shown to correlate with the extent of the polyfunctionality of CD4+ effector memory T cells, whereas neutralizing antibody responses did not protect against superinfection in this model. Notably, immunodeficiency-virus-associated effector memory T-cell responses might significantly contribute to the suppression of virus superinfection. This provides a potential theoretical basis for the development of an HIV/AIDS vaccine.

PMID:
28110425
DOI:
10.1007/s00705-017-3222-7
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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