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Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2017 Mar;63:37-44. doi: 10.1016/j.bcmd.2017.01.004. Epub 2017 Jan 11.

Impaired muscle force production and higher fatigability in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.

Author information

1
Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS, CRMBM, Marseille, France. Electronic address: benjamin.chatel@live.fr.
2
Université Savoie Mont Blanc, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité, EA7424, F-73000 Chambéry, France.
3
Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS, CRMBM, Marseille, France.
4
Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS, CRMBM, Marseille, France; Université Savoie Mont Blanc, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité, EA7424, F-73000 Chambéry, France.

Abstract

Skeletal muscle function has been scarcely investigated in sickle cell disease (SCD) so that the corresponding impact of sickle hemoglobin is still a matter of debate. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle force production and fatigability in SCD and to identify whether exercise intensity could have a modulatory effect. Ten homozygous sickle cell (HbSS), ten control (HbAA) and ten heterozygous (HbAS) mice were submitted to two stimulation protocols (moderate and intense) to assess force production and fatigability. We showed that specific maximal tetanic force was lower in HbSS mice as compared to other groups. At the onset of the stimulation period, peak force was reduced in HbSS and HbAS mice as compared to HbAA mice. Contrary to the moderate protocol, the intense stimulation protocol was associated with a larger decrease in peak force and rate of force development in HbSS mice as compared to HbAA and HbAS mice. These findings provide in vivo evidence of impaired muscle force production and resistance to fatigue in SCD. These changes are independent of muscle mass. Moreover, SCD is associated with muscle fatigability when exercise intensity is high.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise intensity; Muscle mass; Muscle volume; Rate of force development

PMID:
28110136
DOI:
10.1016/j.bcmd.2017.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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