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Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2017 Jun;44:1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.conb.2016.12.010. Epub 2017 Jan 18.

Sleep loss and structural plasticity.

Author information

1
Research Center and Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, 5400 Gouin West blvd., QC, H4J 1C5, Canada; Department of Neuroscience, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, QC, H3C 3J7, Canada.
2
Research Center and Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, 5400 Gouin West blvd., QC, H4J 1C5, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, QC, H3C 3J7, Canada.
3
Research Center and Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, 5400 Gouin West blvd., QC, H4J 1C5, Canada; Department of Neuroscience, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, QC, H3C 3J7, Canada. Electronic address: valerie.mongrain@umontreal.ca.

Abstract

Wakefulness and sleep are dynamic states during which brain functioning is modified and shaped. Sleep loss is detrimental to many brain functions and results in structural changes localized at synapses in the nervous system. In this review, we present and discuss some of the latest observations of structural changes following sleep loss in some vertebrates and insects. We also emphasize that these changes are region-specific and cell type-specific and that, most importantly, these structural modifications have functional roles in sleep regulation and brain functions. Selected mechanisms driving structural modifications occurring with sleep loss are also discussed. Overall, recent research highlights that extending wakefulness impacts synapse number and shape, which in turn regulate sleep need and sleep-dependent learning/memory.

PMID:
28109973
DOI:
10.1016/j.conb.2016.12.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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