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Neuroscience. 2017 Mar 27;346:135-148. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2017.01.011. Epub 2017 Jan 18.

Abnormalities in cortical auditory responses in children with central auditory processing disorder.

Author information

1
École d'orthophonie et d'audiologie, Université de Montréal and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center, Canada. Electronic address: amineh.koravand@uottawa.ca.
2
École d'orthophonie et d'audiologie, Université de Montréal and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center, Canada.
3
Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center, Canada.

Abstract

The main objective of the present study was to identify markers of neural deficits in children with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) by measuring latency and amplitude of the auditory cortical responses and mismatch negativity (MMN) responses. Passive oddball paradigms were used with nonverbal and verbal stimuli to record cortical auditory-evoked potentials and MMN. Twenty-three children aged 9-12 participated in the study: 10 with normal hearing acuity as well as CAPD and 13 with normal hearing without CAPD. No significant group differences were observed for P1 latency and amplitude. Children with CAPD were observed to have significant N2 latency prolongation and amplitude reduction with nonverbal and verbal stimuli compared to children without CAPD. No significant group differences were observed for the MMN conditions. Moreover, electrode position affected the results in the same manner for both groups of children. The findings of the present study suggest that the N2 response could be a marker of neural deficits in children with CAPD. N2 results suggest that maturational factors or a different mechanism could be involved in processing auditory information at the central level for these children.

KEYWORDS:

central auditory processing disorder; cortical auditory-evoked potentials; mismatch responses

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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