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Alzheimers Dement. 2017 Feb;13(2):103-110. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2016.09.007. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Age of onset of hypertension and risk of dementia in the oldest-old: The 90+ Study.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA; Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. Electronic address: mcorrada@uci.edu.
2
Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA; Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
5
Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
6
Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
7
Department of Neurology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA; Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA; Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

We investigated the association between age of onset of hypertension and dementia risk in an oldest-old cohort.

METHODS:

Participants are from The 90+ Study, a population-based longitudinal study of people aged 90+ who are survivors from the Leisure World Cohort Study. We estimated hypertension onset age using self-reported information from The 90+ Study and Leisure World Cohort Study, collected about 20 years earlier. A total of 559 participants without dementia were followed every 6 months for up to 10 years.

RESULTS:

A total of 224 participants developed dementia during follow-up (mean = 2.8 years). Compared with those without hypertension, participants whose hypertension onset age was 80 to 89 years had a lower dementia risk (hazard ratio = 0.58, P = .04) and participants with an onset age of 90+ years had the lowest risk (hazard ratio = 0.37, P = .004).

DISCUSSION:

Developing hypertension at older ages may protect against dementia. Understanding the mechanisms for this lower risk is important for determining ways to prevent dementia in the very elderly.

KEYWORDS:

Blood pressure; Dementia; Epidemiology; Hypertension; Oldest-old; Risk factors

PMID:
28108119
PMCID:
PMC5318224
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2016.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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