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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar;24(8):7335-7347. doi: 10.1007/s11356-016-8253-1. Epub 2017 Jan 20.

Monitoring pharmaceuticals and personal care products in reservoir water used for drinking water supply.

Author information

1
Grupo GDCON, Facultad de Ingeniería, Sede de Investigación Universitaria (SIU), Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín, Colombia. carolina.aristizabal.ciro@gmail.com.
2
Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, 12071, Castellón, Spain. botero@uji.es.
3
Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, 12071, Castellón, Spain.
4
Grupo GDCON, Facultad de Ingeniería, Sede de Investigación Universitaria (SIU), Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín, Colombia.

Abstract

In this work, the presence of selected emerging contaminants has been investigated in two reservoirs, La Fe (LF) and Rio Grande (RG), which supply water to two drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) of Medellin, one of the most populated cities of Colombia. An analytical method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) of the sample followed by measurement by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed and validated for this purpose. Five monitoring campaigns were performed in each reservoir, collecting samples from 7 sites (LF) and 10 sites (RG) at 3 different depths of the water column. In addition, water samples entering in the DWTPs and treated water samples from these plans were also analysed for the selected compounds. Data from this work showed that parabens, UV filters and the pharmaceutical ibuprofen were commonly present in most of the reservoir samples. Thus, methyl paraben was detected in around 90% of the samples collected, while ibuprofen was found in around 60% of the samples. Water samples feeding the DWTPs also contained these two compounds, as well as benzophenone at low concentrations, which was in general agreement with the results from the reservoir samples. After treatment in the DWTPs, these three compounds were still present in the samples although at low concentrations (<40 ng/L), which evidenced that they were not completely removed after the conventional treatment applied. The potential effects of the presence of these compounds at the ppt levels in drinking water are still unknown. Further research is needed to evaluate the effect of chronic exposure to these compounds via consumption of drinking water.

KEYWORDS:

Drinking water; Emerging contaminants; Personal care products; Pharmaceuticals; Reservoir water; UHPLC/MS/MS

PMID:
28105593
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-016-8253-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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