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Physiol Behav. 2017 Mar 15;171:228-235. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.01.009. Epub 2017 Jan 16.

Fluid, energy and nutrient recovery via ad libitum intake of different fluids and food.

Author information

1
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
2
Dept. of Kinesiology, Auburn University at Montgomery, AL, USA.
3
Sports Nutrition, Australian Institute of Sport, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
4
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
5
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: b.desbrow@griffith.edu.au.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

This study compared the effects of ad libitum consumption of different beverages and foods on fluid retention and nutrient intake following exercise.

METHODS:

Ten endurance trained males (mean±SD; Age=25.3±4.9years, VO2max=63.0±7.2mL·kg·min-1) performed four trials employing a counterbalanced, crossover design. Following 60min of exercise (matched for energy expenditure and fluid loss) participants consumed either water (W1 and W2), a sports drink (Powerade® (P)) or a milk-based liquid meal supplement (Sustagen Sport® (SS)) over a four hour recovery period. Additionally, participants had access to snack foods on two occasions within the first 2h of recovery on all trials. All beverages and food were consumed ad libitum. Total nutrient intake, urine volume, USG, body weight as well as subjective measures of gastrointestinal tolerance and thirst were obtained hourly. Plasma osmolality was measured pre, post, 1 and 4h after exercise.

RESULTS:

Total fluid volume ingested from food and beverages in W1 (2.28±0.42L) and P (2.82±0.80L) trials were significantly greater than SS (1.94±0.54L). Total urine output was not different between trials (W1=644±202mL, W2=602±352mL, P=879±751mL, SS=466±129mL). No significant differences in net body weight change was observed between trials (W1=0.01±0.28kg, W2=0.08±0.30kg, P=-0.02±0.24kg, SS=-0.05±0.24kg). Total energy intake was higher on P (10,179±1484kJ) and SS (10,577±2210kJ) compared to both water trials (W1=7826±888kJ, W2=7578±1112kJ).

CONCLUSION:

With the co-ingestion of food, fluid restoration following exercise is tightly regulated and not influenced by the choice of either water, a carbohydrate-electrolyte (sports drink) or a milk-based beverage.

KEYWORDS:

Dehydration; Energy balance; Recovery; Training

PMID:
28104353
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.01.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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