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BMC Public Health. 2017 Jan 19;17(1):94. doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4026-0.

Sedentary behavior among Spanish children and adolescents: findings from the ANIBES study.

Author information

1
ImFINE Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
2
Spanish Nutrition Foundation (FEN), Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
4
CIBER: CB12/03/30038 Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain.
5
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, and Institute of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
6
Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmacy, Complutense University Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
7
Research Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.
8
Department of Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid, Spain.
9
ImFINE Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain. marcela.gonzalez.gross@upm.es.
10
CIBER: CB12/03/30038 Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain. marcela.gonzalez.gross@upm.es.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

An increase of sedentary behaviors far from the Mediterranean lifestyle is happening in spite of the impact on health. The aims of this study were to describe sedentary behaviors in children and adolescents.

METHODS:

A representative sample of 424 Spanish children and adolescents (38% females) involved in the ANIBES study was analyzed regarding their sedentary behaviors, together with the availability of televisions, computers, and consoles by means of the HELENA sedentary behavior questionnaire.

RESULTS:

For the total sample of children, 49.3% during weekdays and 84% during weekends did not meet the recommendation of less than 2 hours of screen viewing per day. The use of TV was higher during weekdays (p < 0.05) and there were significant differences between adolescents and children (16.9 vs. 25.1%, p < 0.05). The use of computer, console games and of internet for non-study reasons was higher during weekends (p < 0.001). Adolescents played more computer games and used more internet for non-study reasons than children during both weekdays and weekends (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). The use of internet for academic reasons was lower in children (p < 0.001) than adolescents during weekends; however, no significant differences were found between sexes. In addition, more than 30% of the children and adolescents had at least one electronic device in their bedrooms.

CONCLUSIONS:

Spanish children and adolescents are not meeting the recommendations regarding the maximum of screen viewing (<2 h/day), especially during the weekend, for all of sedentary behaviors. Urgent strategies and intervention studies are needed to reduce sedentary behavior in young people.

KEYWORDS:

ANIBES Study; Child; Physical activity; Sedentary lifestyle; Youth

PMID:
28103843
PMCID:
PMC5244608
DOI:
10.1186/s12889-017-4026-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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