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BMC Public Health. 2017 Jan 19;17(1):98. doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4019-z.

Secondhand smoke exposure at home among middle and high school students in the United States - does the type of tobacco product matter?

Author information

1
Department of Public Health Medicine, School of Public Health, Bielefeld University, P.O. Box 100 131, 33501, Bielefeld, Germany. f.fischer@uni-bielefeld.de.
2
Department of Public Health Medicine, School of Public Health, Bielefeld University, P.O. Box 100 131, 33501, Bielefeld, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A decline in the prevalence of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure has been observed in the United States of America (USA) during the past few decades. Nevertheless, nearly half of non-smoking students are still exposed to SHS. This paper aims to describe the factors associated with SHS exposure stratified by type of exposure (overall, cigarettes and electronic cigarettes).

METHODS:

The analysis is based on secondary data taken from the National Youth Tobacco Survey 2014. Overall, 22,007 middle and high school students from the USA are included in the sample. Descriptive and bivariate statistics as well as binary logistic regression models were performed.

RESULTS:

Overall, 44.5% (n=9,798) of the study participants declared themselves to be exposed to SHS, 29.1% (n=6,394) declared to be exposed to SHS caused by cigarette smoke and 9.4% (n=2,067) claimed that a person who lives with them uses electronic cigarettes. There is a considerable overlap between the two types of SHS exposure, because 74.9% (n=1,548) of students declaring that a person within their household uses electronic cigarettes also declare a person in the household smoking cigarettes. The strengths of association between independent variables and SHS exposure differs by type of exposure and also by smoking status of respondents.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although only small differences are obvious in the factors associated with SHS exposure stratified by the type of tobacco product, there are still some variations which should be considered in policy making to allow for a targeted approach in prevention campaigns or legislation.

KEYWORDS:

National Youth Tobacco Survey; Secondhand smoke; Students; USA; United States

PMID:
28103827
PMCID:
PMC5248465
DOI:
10.1186/s12889-017-4019-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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