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Rev Endocr Metab Disord. 2017 Sep;18(3):273-283. doi: 10.1007/s11154-017-9407-2.

Shedding new light on female fertility: The role of vitamin D.

Author information

1
Ios and Coleman Medicina Futura Medical Center, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Section of Endocrinology, University "Federico II", Via Sergio Pasini, 580121, Naples, Italy. giovanna.muscogiuri@gmail.com.
2
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Institute of Medical Pathology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.
3
Ios and Coleman Medicina Futura Medical Center, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Section of Endocrinology, University "Federico II", Via Sergio Pasini, 580121, Naples, Italy.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova-IRCCS, 42123, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
5
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University "Federico II", Naples, Italy.
6
Department of Sports Science and Wellness, "Parthenope" University Naples, Naples, Italy.

Abstract

In the last decades several studies suggested that vitamin D is involved in the modulation of the reproductive process in women due to the expression of VDR and 1α-hydroxylase in reproductive tissues such as ovary, uterus, placenta, pituitary and hypothalamus. Vitamin D has also a role in the regulation of sex hormone steroidogenesis. Increasing evidence suggests that vitamin D might have a regulatory role in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-associated symptoms, including ovulatory dysfunction, insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism. Vitamin D deficiency also has been reported to contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis due to its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Although most of the studies supported a role of vitamin D in the onset of these diseases, randomized controlled trials to assess the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation have never been performed. In this review we critically discuss the role of vitamin D in female fertility, starting from in vitro and in vivo studies, focusing our attention on the two most frequent causes of female infertility: PCOS and endometriosis.

KEYWORDS:

Endometriosis; Female fertility; PCOS; Vitamin D

PMID:
28102491
DOI:
10.1007/s11154-017-9407-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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