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Obes Surg. 2017 Jul;27(7):1705-1708. doi: 10.1007/s11695-017-2555-3.

Prediction of Diabetes Remission at Long Term Following Biliopancreatic Diversion.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, IRCCS San Martino and Università di Genova, Genoa, Italy.
2
Department of Endocrinology, IRCCS San Martino and Università di Genova, Genoa, Italy. adami@unige.it.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 8, 15132, Genoa, Italy. adami@unige.it.
4
Department of Statistics, IRCCS San Martino and Università di Genova, Genoa, Italy.
5
Department of Endocrinology, IRCCS San Martino and Università di Genova, Genoa, Italy.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 8, 15132, Genoa, Italy.

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

In obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), the marked weight loss following bariatric surgery is accompanied in a consistent number of cases by T2DM resolution or control. The clinical need of preoperative parameters reliable in predicting a positive metabolic outcome at long term following the operation has then emerged.

OBSERVATION:

A cohort of 135 consecutive T2DM patients with a wide range of body mass index (BMI) at more than 5 years following biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) was considered. The 5-year-T2DM resolution, defined as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) lower than 6.5% without antidiabetic therapy, was related to demographic, anthropometric, and biochemical findings prior to the operation. The long-term metabolic outcome was positively related to baseline BMI values and negatively with the preoperative use of insulin.

CONCLUSION:

BMI and insulin therapy at the time of surgery are associated with the probability of T2DM long lasting remission and could be used as solid predictors before surgery. In the overweight and non morbidly obese diabetic patients, bariatric surgery is less efficient in determining long term T2DM resolution than in their morbid obese counterparts.

KEYWORDS:

Baritatric surgery; Obesity; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
28101844
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-017-2555-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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