Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Rep. 2017 Jan 17;18(3):737-750. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.12.071.

A Molecular and Cellular Context-Dependent Role for Ir76b in Detection of Amino Acid Taste.

Author information

1
Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.
2
Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.
3
University Honors Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.
4
Undergraduate Anthropology Major, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.
5
Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA; Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA. Electronic address: anupama.dahanukar@ucr.edu.

Abstract

Amino acid taste is expected to be a universal property among animals. Although sweet, bitter, salt, and water tastes have been well characterized in insects, the mechanisms underlying amino acid taste remain elusive. From a Drosophila RNAi screen, we identify an ionotropic receptor, Ir76b, as necessary for yeast preference. Using calcium imaging, we identify Ir76b+ amino acid taste neurons in legs, overlapping partially with sweet neurons but not those that sense other tastants. Ir76b mutants have reduced responses to amino acids, which are rescued by transgenic expression of Ir76b and a mosquito ortholog AgIr76b. Co-expression of Ir20a with Ir76b is sufficient for conferring amino acid responses in sweet-taste neurons. Notably, Ir20a also serves to block salt response of Ir76b. Our study establishes the role of a highly conserved receptor in amino acid taste and suggests a mechanism for mutually exclusive roles of Ir76b in salt- and amino-acid-sensing neurons.

KEYWORDS:

Drosophila; Ir76b; amino acid taste; feeding behavior; ionotropic receptors; post-mating behavior

PMID:
28099851
PMCID:
PMC5258133
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.12.071
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center