Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Viruses. 2017 Jan 13;9(1). pii: E4. doi: 10.3390/v9010004.

A Semipersistent Plant Virus Differentially Manipulates Feeding Behaviors of Different Sexes and Biotypes of Its Whitefly Vector.

Author information

1
College of Plant Protection, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, China. shaohualu08@163.com.
2
College of Plant Protection, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, China. lijingjing_319@163.com.
3
College of Plant Protection, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, China. wxl2010@yeal.net.
4
College of Plant Protection, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, China. songdanyang2@163.com.
5
College of Plant Protection, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, China. yxbre@163.com.
6
College of Plant Protection, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, China. shiyan00925@126.com.
7
Zhengzhou Fruit Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Zhengzhou 410100, China. guqinsheng@caas.cn.
8
Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8600, USA. ywkuo@ucdavis.edu.
9
Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8600, USA. bwfalk@ucdavis.edu.
10
College of Plant Protection, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, China. fmyan@henau.edu.cn.

Abstract

It is known that plant viruses can change the performance of their vectors. However, there have been no reports on whether or how a semipersistent plant virus manipulates the feeding behaviors of its whitefly vectors. Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus (CCYV) (genus Crinivirus, family Closteroviridae) is an emergent plant virus in many Asian countries and is transmitted specifically by B and Q biotypes of tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), in a semipersistent manner. In the present study, we used electrical penetration graph (EPG) technique to investigate the effect of CCYV on the feeding behaviors of B. tabaci. The results showed that CCYV altered feeding behaviors of both biotypes and sexes of B. tabaci with different degrees. CCYV had stronger effects on feeding behaviors of Q biotype than those of B biotype, by increasing duration of phloem salivation and sap ingestion, and could differentially manipulate feeding behaviors of males and females in both biotype whiteflies, with more phloem ingestion in Q biotype males and more non-phloem probing in B biotype males than their respective females. With regard to feeding behaviors related to virus transmission, these results indicated that, when carrying CCYV, B. tabaci Q biotype plays more roles than B biotype, and males make greater contribution than females.

KEYWORDS:

Bemisia tabaci; CCYV; EPG; cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus; electrical penetration graph; feeding behaviors

PMID:
28098749
PMCID:
PMC5294973
DOI:
10.3390/v9010004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center