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Atten Defic Hyperact Disord. 2017 Sep;9(3):189-198. doi: 10.1007/s12402-017-0218-9. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Prevalence and correlates of ADHD in individuals with substance use disorder in Nigeria.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Bayero University Kano, PMB 3011, Kano, Nigeria. sophiee87@yahoo.com.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. sophiee87@yahoo.com.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Bayero University Kano, PMB 3011, Kano, Nigeria.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria.

Abstract

Substance use disorder (SUD) is associated with ADHD. ADHD increases the severity of SUD and has negative influence on the prognosis of the disorder. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of ADHD in individuals with SUD. During 2013-2015, a cross-sectional descriptive study of 233 drug treatment-seeking individuals was assessed. Diagnosis of ADHD was done using DSM-IV criteria with the Diagnostic Interview for ADHD in Adults (DIVA 2.0), while Semi-structured Assessment for Drug Dependence and Alcoholism (SSADDA 6.1) and Adult ADHD Quality of Life (AAQoL) were used for diagnosis of substance use disorder and assessment of QoL, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors that were associated with ADHD. The prevalence of ADHD in SUD patients was 21.5%, with the combined subtype being the most prevalent. SUD patient with ADHD had more history of severe dependence on cigarette, depression, suicidal ideation, aggression, dependence on benzodiazepine and heroin, number of relapses, poor QoL and number of hospitalization. After logistic regression, only the number of relapses (p = 0.004), history of aggression (<0.001) and poor QoL differentiated between SUD patients with ADHD from those with no diagnosis of ADHD. The prevalence of ADHD in SUD individuals is high and may be associated with a more severe phenotypic expression of SUD.

KEYWORDS:

ADHD; Correlates; Prevalence; Substance use disorder

PMID:
28097536
DOI:
10.1007/s12402-017-0218-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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