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Sports Med. 2017 Aug;47(8):1589-1599. doi: 10.1007/s40279-017-0675-5.

Polyphenols and Performance: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medical and Health Science, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. vsom721@aucklanduni.ac.nz.
2
Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medical and Health Science, School of Medicine, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
3
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medical and Health Science, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Polyphenols exert physiological effects that may impact athletic performance. Polyphenols are antioxidants that have been noted to hinder training adaptations, yet conversely they stimulate stress-related cell signalling pathways that trigger mitochondrial biogenesis and influence vascular function.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the overall effect of polyphenols on human athletic performance.

METHODS:

A search strategy was completed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED and SPORTDiscus in April 2016. The studies were screened and independently reviewed by two researchers against predetermined criteria for eligibility. As a result of this screening, 14 studies were included for meta-analysis. Of these, the studied populations were predominately-trained males with an average intervention dose of 688 ± 478 mg·day-1.

RESULTS:

The pooled results demonstrate polyphenol supplementation for at least 7 days increases performance by 1.90% (95% CI 0.40-3.39). Sub-analysis of seven studies using quercetin identified a performance increase of 2.82% (95% CI 2.05-3.58). There were no adverse effects reported in the studies in relation to the intervention.

CONCLUSION:

Overall the pooled results show that polyphenols, and of note quercetin, are viable supplements to improve performance in healthy individuals.

PMID:
28097488
DOI:
10.1007/s40279-017-0675-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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