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Clin Transl Oncol. 2017 Jul;19(7):799-825. doi: 10.1007/s12094-016-1607-9. Epub 2017 Jan 16.

Cancer incidence in Spain, 2015.

Author information

1
Tarragona Cancer Registry, Fundation Society for Cancer Research and Prevention (FUNCA), Pere Virgili Health Research Institute (IISPV), Reus, Spain. jgalceran@grupsagessa.com.
2
University Rovira i Virgili, Reus, Spain. jgalceran@grupsagessa.com.
3
Tarragona Cancer Registry, Fundation Society for Cancer Research and Prevention (FUNCA), Pere Virgili Health Research Institute (IISPV), Reus, Spain.
4
Albacete Cancer Registry, Health and Social Welfare Authority, Castile-La Mancha, Spain.
5
Asturias Cancer Registry, Public Health Directorate, Department of Health, Asturias, Spain.
6
Canary Islands Cancer Registry (Gran Canaria), Public Health Directorate, Canary Islands Government, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.
7
Canary Islands Cancer Registry (Tenerife), Public Health Directorate, Canary Islands Government, Tenerife, Spain.
8
Castellón Cancer Registry, Public Health Directorate, Valencian Government, Castellón, Spain.
9
Ciudad Real Cancer Registry, Health and Social Welfare Authority, Castile-La Mancha, Spain.
10
C. Valenciana Childhood Cancer Registry, Public Health Directorate, Valencian Government, Valencia, Spain.
11
Cuenca Cancer Registry, Health and Social Welfare Authority, Castile-La Mancha, Spain.
12
Basque Country Cancer Registry, Health Department, Basque Government, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain.
13
CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
14
Epidemiology Unit and Girona Cancer Registry (UERCG), Oncology Coordination Plan (PDO), Department of Health, Autonomous Government of Catalonia, Descriptive Epidemiology, Genetics and Cancer Prevention Group [Girona Biomedical Research Institute] IDIBGI, Catalan Institute of Oncology-Girona (ICO), Girona, Spain.
15
University of Girona (UdG), Girona, Spain.
16
Registro de Cáncer de Granada, Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain.
17
Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain.
18
La Rioja Cancer Registry, Epidemiology and Health Prevention Service, Logroño, Spain.
19
Mallorca Cancer Registry, Public Health and Participation Department, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
20
Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
21
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
22
Navarre Cancer Registry, Navarre Public Health Institute, IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain.
23
Zaragoza Cancer Registry, Aragon Health Science Institute, Saragossa, Spain.
24
Spanish Childhood Cancer Registry, Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Periodic cancer incidence estimates of Spain from all existing population-based cancer registries at any given time are required. The objective of this study was to present the current situation of cancer incidence in Spain.

METHODS:

The Spanish Network of Cancer Registries (REDECAN) estimated the numbers of new cancer cases occurred in Spain in 2015 by applying the incidence-mortality ratios method. In the calculus, incidence data from population-based cancer registries and mortality data of all Spain were used.

RESULTS:

In 2015, nearly a quarter of a million new invasive cancer cases were diagnosed in Spain, almost 149,000 in men (60.0%) and 99,000 in women. Globally, the five most common cancers were those of colon-rectum, prostate, lung, breast and urinary bladder. By gender, the four most common cancers in men were those of prostate (22.4%), colon-rectum (16.6%), lung (15.1%) and urinary bladder (11.7%). In women, the most common ones were those of breast (28.0%), colon-rectum (16.9%), corpus uteri (6.2%) and lung (6.0%). In recent years, cancer incidence in men seems to have stabilized due to the fact that the decrease in tobacco-related cancers compensates for the increase in other types of cancer like those of colon and prostate. In women, despite the stabilization of breast cancer incidence, increased incidence is due, above all, to the rise of colorectal and tobacco-related cancers.

CONCLUSION:

To reduce these incident cancer cases, improvement of smoking control policies and extension of colorectal cancer screening should be the two priorities in cancer prevention for the next years.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Cancer cases; Cancer statistics; Incidence; Spain; Trends

PMID:
28093701
DOI:
10.1007/s12094-016-1607-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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