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Biofabrication. 2017 Jan 16;9(1):015011. doi: 10.1088/1758-5090/aa564c.

Optoelectrofluidic printing system for fabricating hydrogel sheets with on-demand patterned cells and microparticles.

Author information

1
Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

This paper presents a novel optoelectrofluidic printing system that facilitates not only the optoelectrofluidic patterning of microparticles and mammalian cells but also the harvesting of the patterned microparticles encapsulated within poly(ethylene glycol) dicarylate (PEGDA) hydrogel sheets. Although optoelectrofluidic technology has numerous advantages for programmable and on-demand patterning and the feasibility of manipulating single microparticles, practical applications using existing laboratory infrastructure in biological and clinical research fields have been strictly restricted due to the impossibility of recovering the final patterned product. In order to address these harvesting limitations, PEGDA was employed to utilize optoelectrofluidic printing. The Clausius-Mossotti factor was calculated to investigate the dielectrophoretic mobility of the microparticle and the cell in the PEGDA precursor solution. As a proof of concept, three basic controllabilities of the optoelectrofluidic printing system were characterized: the number of microparticles, the distance between the microparticle columns, and the ratio of two different microparticles. Furthermore, the optoelectrofluidic patterning and printing of human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) were demonstrated in 5 min with a single-cell level of resolution. The appropriate ranges of frequency were experimentally defined based on the calculated result of the dielectrophoretic mobility of HepG2 cells. Finally, optoelectrofluidically cell-patterned hydrogel sheets were successfully recovered under a highly viable physiological condition.

PMID:
28092631
DOI:
10.1088/1758-5090/aa564c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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