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Neuroimage. 2017 Mar 1;148:123-129. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.01.018. Epub 2017 Jan 10.

Reduced effects of age on dopamine D2 receptor levels in physically active adults.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, 219 Wilson Hall, 111 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. Electronic address: linh.dang@vanderbilt.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, 219 Wilson Hall, 111 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37203, USA.
3
Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1211 Medical Center Drive, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1601 23rd Ave South, Nashville, TN 37212, USA; Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1211 Medical Center Drive, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
5
Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, 219 Wilson Hall, 111 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37203, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1601 23rd Ave South, Nashville, TN 37212, USA.
6
Department of Psychology, Yale University, 2 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: g.samanezlarkin@duke.edu.

Abstract

Physical activity has been shown to ameliorate dopaminergic degeneration in non-human animal models. However, the effects of regular physical activity on normal age-related changes in dopamine function in humans are unknown. Here we present cross-sectional data from forty-four healthy human subjects between 23 and 80 years old, showing that typical age-related dopamine D2 receptor loss, assessed with PET [18F]fallypride, was significantly reduced in physically active adults compared to less active adults.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Dopamine; Physical activity

PMID:
28089678
PMCID:
PMC5344739
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.01.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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