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J Biosci Bioeng. 2017 May;123(5):562-568. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiosc.2016.12.008. Epub 2017 Jan 11.

Butyrate production under aerobic growth conditions by engineered Escherichia coli.

Author information

1
Division of Agricultural Sciences, Graduate School of Sciences and Technology for Innovation, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan; Research Center for Thermotolerant Microbial Resources, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan. Electronic address: nkataoka@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Center of Excellence in Hazardous Substance Management (HSM), Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
3
Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.
4
Division of Agricultural Sciences, Graduate School of Sciences and Technology for Innovation, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan; Research Center for Thermotolerant Microbial Resources, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan.

Abstract

Butyrate is an important industrial platform chemical. Although several groups have reported butyrate production under oxygen-limited conditions by a native producer, Clostridium tyrobutylicum, and by a metabolically engineered Escherichia coli, efforts to produce butyrate under aerobic growth conditions have met limited success. Here, we constructed a novel butyrate synthetic pathway that functions under aerobic growth conditions in E. coli, by modifying the 1-butanol synthetic pathway reported previously. The pathway consists of phaA (acetyltransferase) and phaB (NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase) from Ralstonia eutropha, phaJ ((R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase) from Aeromonas caviae, ter (trans-enoyl-CoA reductase) from Treponema denticola, and endogenous thioesterase(s) of E. coli. To evaluate the potential of this pathway for butyrate production, culture conditions, including pH, oxygen supply, and concentration of inorganic nitrogen sources, were optimized in a mini-jar fermentor. Under the optimal conditions, butyrate was produced at a concentration of up to 140 mM (12.3 g/L in terms of butyric acid) after 54 h of fed-batch culture.

KEYWORDS:

Aerobic synthesis; Butyrate; Escherichia coli; Fermentation; Synthetic pathway

PMID:
28089378
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbiosc.2016.12.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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