Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Injury. 2017 Feb;48(2):230-242. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2016.12.012. Epub 2016 Dec 26.

Fibrinogen in traumatic haemorrhage: A narrative review.

Author information

1
Gold Coast University Hospital, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, Griffith University, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: james.winearls@health.qld.gov.au.
2
Gold Coast University Hospital, Australia. Electronic address: don.campbell@health.qld.gov.au.
3
Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: catherine.hurn@health.qld.gov.au.
4
Townsville Hospital, Australia. Electronic address: jeremy.furyk@health.qld.gov.au.
5
Princess Alexandra Hospital, Australia. Electronic address: glenn.ryan@health.qld.gov.au.
6
Townsville Hospital, Australia. Electronic address: melita.trout@health.qld.gov.au.
7
Princess Alexandra Hospital, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: james.walsham@health.qld.gov.au.
8
Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: anthony.holley@health.qld.gov.au.
9
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Australia. Electronic address: m.shuttleworth@griffith.edu.au.
10
Australian Red Cross Blood Service, Australia. Electronic address: W.Dyer@redcrossblood.org.au.
11
Gold Coast University Hospital, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, Griffith University, Australia; School of Medicine, Bond University, Australia. Electronic address: gerben.keijzers@health.qld.gov.au.
12
Royal Melbourne Hospital, Australia. Electronic address: jeffrey.presneill@health.qld.gov.au.
13
School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Australia; The Prince Charles Hospital, Australia. Electronic address: john.fraser@health.qld.gov.au.
14
Gold Coast University Hospital, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, Griffith University, Australia. Electronic address: martin.wullschleger@health.qld.gov.au.

Abstract

Haemorrhage in the setting of severe trauma is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. There is increasing awareness of the important role fibrinogen plays in traumatic haemorrhage. Fibrinogen levels fall precipitously in severe trauma and the resultant hypofibrinogenaemia is associated with poor outcomes. Hence, it has been postulated that early fibrinogen replacement in severe traumatic haemorrhage may improve outcomes, although, to date there is a paucity of high quality evidence to support this hypothesis. In addition there is controversy regarding the optimal method for fibrinogen supplementation. We review the current evidence regarding the role of fibrinogen in trauma, the rationale behind fibrinogen supplementation and discuss current research.

KEYWORDS:

Coagulopathy; Cryoprecipitate; Fibrinogen; Fibrinogen concentrate; Massive transfusion; Trauma; Viscoelastic haemostatic assays

PMID:
28088374
DOI:
10.1016/j.injury.2016.12.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center