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J Infect Chemother. 2017 Mar;23(3):165-172. doi: 10.1016/j.jiac.2016.11.011. Epub 2017 Jan 10.

Molecular epidemiological analysis of human- and chicken-derived isolates of Campylobacter jejuni in Japan using next-generation sequencing.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Infection Control and Prevention, Osaki Citizen Hospital, Miyagi, Japan.
2
Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: yishii@med.toho-u.ac.jp.
4
Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Food Safety, Division of Health and Environmental Science School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Hokkaido, Japan.
5
National Veterinary Assay Laboratory, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh General Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

In this research, we analyzed the main sequence types (ST) and ST complexes of human- and chicken-derived isolates of Campylobacter jejuni in Japan by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We also analyzed lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis locus classes (LOS locus classes) and the numbers of isolates carrying genes coding resistance factors against various antibiotics, and observed their relationships. ST-21 complex was the main ST complex in isolates from humans (n = 38) and chickens (n = 25). None of the isolates showed resistance to imipenem, chloramphenicol, or erythromycin. Few isolates were resistant to ampicillin and streptomycin (1.3%-15%), whereas many showed resistance to tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, and nalidixic acid (38%-48%). Among the ST-21 complex isolates, ST4526 was detected at a very high rate. Those isolates showed resistance to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin, and were susceptible to ampicillin. Among the chicken-derived isolates, 37 of the 38 isolates that showed resistance to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid had threonine to isoleucine amino acid substitution in GyrA at codon 86 (T86I). Among the human-derived isolates, 17 of the 47 isolates that showed resistance to ciprofloxacin and 16 of the 48 isolates that showed resistance to nalidixic acid did not have T86I amino acid mutations in GyrA. The human-derived ST-21 complex isolates were classified into LOS locus classes A, B, C, D, and E. The chicken-derived ST-21 complex isolates, with the exception of one isolate, were all classified into LOS locus classes C and D. Among chicken-derived isolates, the most prevalent was ST51 (ST-443 complex) (10 isolates) and all of those were LOS locus class E.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotic susceptibility testing; Campylobacter jejuni; Chickens; Lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis locus class; Multilocus sequence typing

PMID:
28087306
DOI:
10.1016/j.jiac.2016.11.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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