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J Am Coll Health. 2017 May-Jun;65(4):288-293. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2017.1280799. Epub 2017 Jan 13.

Characteristics of university students who mix alcohol and energy drinks.

Author information

1
a Department of Psychiatry , University of Michigan , Ann Arbor , Michigan , USA.
2
b VISN 2 Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention , Canandaigua VA Medical Center , Canandaigua , New York , USA.
3
c Department of Psychiatry , University of Rochester , Rochester , New York , USA.
4
d Department of Psychology , Bowling Green State University , Bowling Green , Ohio , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Research has identified correlates (eg, drug use, risky sex, smoking) of using alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AMEDs). Few studies have investigated common mental health-related concerns (eg, depression, sleep).

PARTICIPANTS:

Alcohol-using college students (n = 380 never used AMEDs, n = 180 used AMEDs) were recruited in the study during the fall 2011 semester.

METHODS:

The study examined demographics, substance use, depressive symptoms, and sleep problems in association with AMED use.

RESULTS:

Multivariable logistic regression indicated that alcohol use severity (AOR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.14+1.34), drug use severity (AOR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.04-1.39), depressive symptoms (AOR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.01-1.12), and smoking (AOR = 2.12; 95% CI = 1.22-3.68) were independently associated with AMED use; sleep problems were non-significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Administrators may consider policies regarding energy drink availability on campus, and campus health personnel may increase screening and education surrounding AMED use to reduce risks among students.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; energy drinks; university students

PMID:
28085661
DOI:
10.1080/07448481.2017.1280799
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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