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Science. 2017 Jan 13;355(6321):194-197. doi: 10.1126/science.aal2130.

Assembly of a nucleus-like structure during viral replication in bacteria.

Author information

1
Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
2
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
3
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
4
Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. jpogliano@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

We observed the assembly of a nucleus-like structure in bacteria during viral infection. Using fluorescence microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, we showed that Pseudomonas chlororaphis phage 201φ2-1 assembled a compartment that separated viral DNA from the cytoplasm. The phage compartment was centered by a bipolar tubulin-based spindle, and it segregated phage and bacterial proteins according to function. Proteins involved in DNA replication and transcription localized inside the compartment, whereas proteins involved in translation and nucleotide synthesis localized outside. Later during infection, viral capsids assembled on the cytoplasmic membrane and moved to the surface of the compartment for DNA packaging. Ultimately, viral particles were released from the compartment and the cell lysed. These results demonstrate that phages have evolved a specialized structure to compartmentalize viral replication.

PMID:
28082593
PMCID:
PMC6028185
DOI:
10.1126/science.aal2130
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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