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Am J Prev Med. 2017 Apr;52(4):e95-e101. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.11.021. Epub 2017 Jan 9.

Exercise Intensity and Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome: The SUN Project.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Navarra Clinic, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain. Electronic address: mhidalgos@unav.es.
2
Department of Occupational Medicine, University of Navarra Clinic, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain.
3
Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain.
4
Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain; Pediatrics Service, Complejo Hospital de Navarra, Servicio Navarro de Salud, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain.
5
Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.
6
Department of Cardiac Electrofisiology and Clinic Arrhythmology, Monteprincipe Hospital, Boadilla de Monte, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Emerging evidence suggests that vigorous physical activity may be associated with higher cardioprotective benefits than moderate physical activity. This study aimed to assess the long-term relationship between the intensity of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and the risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MS) in a prospective cohort study.

METHODS:

The Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) Project comprises Spanish university graduates. Participants (n=10,145) initially free of MS were followed for a minimum of 6 years (2008-2014). Analysis was conducted in 2015. Physical activity was assessed though a validated questionnaire. The intensity of each physical activity was measured in METs. The intensity of LTPA was estimated by the ratio between total METs/week and total hours of LTPA/week, obtaining the mean METs/hour of LTPA. MS was defined according to the harmonizing definition. The association between the intensity of LTPA (METs/hour) and MS was assessed with logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

Among 10,145 participants initially free of any MS criteria, 412 new MS cases were observed. Vigorous LTPA was associated with a 37% relatively lower risk (AOR=0.63, 95% CI=0.44, 0.89) compared with light LTPA. For a given total energy expenditure, independent of the time spent on it, participants who performed vigorous LTPA exhibited a higher reduction in the risk of MS than those who performed light to moderate LTPA.

CONCLUSIONS:

Vigorous LTPA was significantly associated with lower risk of developing MS after a 6-year follow-up period.

PMID:
28082000
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2016.11.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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