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J Pediatr. 2017 Apr;183:178-183.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.12.048. Epub 2017 Jan 10.

Health-Related Quality of Life and Lifestyle Behavior Clusters in School-Aged Children from 12 Countries.

Author information

1
School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia. Electronic address: Dorothea.dumuid@mymail.unisa.edu.au.
2
School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia.
3
School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia; School of Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia.
4
Department of Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Statistics, University of Girona, Girona, Spain.
5
Population Science, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA.
6
Population Science, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA; School of Education, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY.
7
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada.
8
Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
9
Department of Nutrition, St John's Research Institute, Karnataka, India.
10
Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
11
Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
12
Center for the Study of Physical Fitness Laboratory of São Caetano do Sul (CELAFISCS), São Caetano do Sul, Brazil.
13
Department of Recreation Management and Exercise Science, Kenyatta University, Nairobi City, Kenya.
14
School of Medicine, University of the Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.
15
Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath, UK.
16
Department of Kinesiology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA.
17
Tianjin Women's and Children's Health Center, Tianjin, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the relationship between children's lifestyles and health-related quality of life and to explore whether this relationship varies among children from different world regions.

STUDY DESIGN:

This study used cross-sectional data from the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment. Children (9-11 years) were recruited from sites in 12 nations (n = 5759). Clustering input variables were 24-hour accelerometry and self-reported diet and screen time. Health-related quality of life was self-reported with KIDSCREEN-10. Cluster analyses (using compositional analysis techniques) were performed on a site-wise basis. Lifestyle behavior cluster characteristics were compared between sites. The relationship between cluster membership and health-related quality of life was assessed with the use of linear models.

RESULTS:

Lifestyle behavior clusters were similar across the 12 sites, with clusters commonly characterized by (1) high physical activity (actives); (2) high sedentary behavior (sitters); (3) high screen time/unhealthy eating pattern (junk-food screenies); and (4) low screen time/healthy eating pattern and moderate physical activity/sedentary behavior (all-rounders). Health-related quality of life was greatest in the all-rounders cluster.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children from different world regions clustered into groups of similar lifestyle behaviors. Cluster membership was related to differing health-related quality of life, with children from the all-rounders cluster consistently reporting greatest health-related quality of life at sites around the world. Findings support the importance of a healthy combination of lifestyle behaviors in childhood: low screen time, healthy eating pattern, and balanced daily activity behaviors (physical activity and sedentary behavior).

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01722500.

KEYWORDS:

compositional analysis; diet; physical activity; screen time; sedentary behavior

PMID:
28081885
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.12.048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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