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Ocul Immunol Inflamm. 2018;26(5):693-699. doi: 10.1080/09273948.2016.1269930. Epub 2017 Jan 12.

Corneal Melt after Boston Keratoprosthesis: Clinical Presentation, Management, Outcomes and Risk Factor Analysis.

Author information

1
a Faculty of Medicine, McGill University , Montréal , Québec , Canada.
2
b Department of Ophthalmology , Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal , Montréal , Québec , Canada.
3
c Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal , Montréal , Québec , Canada.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the presentation, risk factors, and outcomes of keratolysis after Boston type I keratoprosthesis (B-KPro).

METHODS:

Retrospective chart review.

RESULTS:

A total of 16 (14%) of the 110 eyes (96 patients) which underwent B-KPro implantation developed keratolysis at an average 20 ± 11 months. Retroprosthetic membrane (RPM), infectious keratitis, and corneal dellen were identified in 31%, 25%, and 13% of corneal melts, respectively. Five eyes had keratolysis without a readily identifiable cause. RPM (odds-ratio, OR = 4.4, p = 0.02) and infectious keratitis (OR = 17.6, p<0.0005) were confirmed as significant risk factors. Retinal detachment (p = 0.001) and choroidal detachment (p = 0.003) were more common in eyes with keratolysis. Management included B-KPro removal or exchange (n = 7), amniotic membrane transplantation (n = 1), tectonic corneal transplantation (n = 2), medical treatment (n = 4), and observation (n = 2).

CONCLUSIONS:

The risk of keratolysis following B-Kpro increases with the development of RPM and infectious keratitis. Patients with keratolysis had higher complication rates and should receive rigorous monitoring.

KEYWORDS:

Corneal melting; keratoprosthesis; matrix metalloproteinases; retroprosthetic membrane; sterile keratolysis

PMID:
28080168
DOI:
10.1080/09273948.2016.1269930
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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