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Public Health Nutr. 2017 May;20(7):1226-1234. doi: 10.1017/S136898001600344X. Epub 2017 Jan 12.

Association of BMI with risk of CVD mortality and all-cause mortality.

Author information

1
1Epidemiology & Biostatistics Unit,Institute for Medical Research,Jalan Pahang,50588 Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.
2
2Non Communicable Diseases Research Center,Institute for Public Health,Jalan Bangsar,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.
3
3Clinical Epidemiology Unit,Clinical Research Centre,Jalan Pahang,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.
4
4Centre for Communicable Disease,Institute for Public Health,Jalan Bangsar,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the relationship between BMI and risk of CVD mortality and all-cause mortality among Malaysian adults.

DESIGN:

Population-based, retrospective cohort study. Participants were followed up for 5 years from 2006 to 2010. Mortality data were obtained via record linkages with the Malaysian National Registration Department. Multiple Cox regression was applied to compare risk of CVD and all-cause mortality between BMI categories adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity. Models were generated for all participants, all participants the first 2 years of follow-up, healthy participants, healthy never smokers, never smokers, current smokers and former smokers.

SETTING:

All fourteen states in Malaysia.

SUBJECTS:

Malaysian adults (n 32 839) aged 18 years or above from the third National Health and Morbidity Survey.

RESULTS:

Total follow-up time was 153 814 person-years with 1035 deaths from all causes and 225 deaths from CVD. Underweight (BMI<18·5 kg/m2) was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality, while obesity (BMI ≥30·0 kg/m2) was associated with a heightened risk of CVD mortality. Overweight (BMI=25·0-29·9 kg/m2) was inversely associated with risk of all-cause mortality. Underweight was significantly associated with all-cause mortality in all models except for current smokers. Overweight was inversely associated with all-cause mortality in all participants. Although a positive trend was observed between BMI and CVD mortality in all participants, a significant association was observed only for severe obesity (BMI≥35·0 kg/m2).

CONCLUSIONS:

Underweight was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality and obesity with increased risk of CVD mortality. Therefore, maintaining a normal BMI through leading an active lifestyle and healthy dietary habits should continue to be promoted.

KEYWORDS:

BMI; CVD; Mortality; Obesity; Overweight

PMID:
28077198
DOI:
10.1017/S136898001600344X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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