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Trends Immunol. 2017 Mar;38(3):217-228. doi: 10.1016/j.it.2016.12.003. Epub 2017 Jan 7.

HIV Latency: Should We Shock or Lock?

Author information

1
Service of Molecular Virology, Département de Biologie Moléculaire (DBM), Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Rue des Professeurs Jeener et Brachet 12, 6041 Gosselies, Belgium; Service des Maladies Infectieuses, Université de Liège, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) de Liège, Domaine Universitaire du Sart-Tilman, B35, 4000 Liège, Belgium.
2
Service of Molecular Virology, Département de Biologie Moléculaire (DBM), Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Rue des Professeurs Jeener et Brachet 12, 6041 Gosselies, Belgium.
3
Service of Molecular Virology, Département de Biologie Moléculaire (DBM), Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Rue des Professeurs Jeener et Brachet 12, 6041 Gosselies, Belgium. Electronic address: cvlint@ulb.ac.be.

Abstract

Combinatory antiretroviral therapy (cART) increases the survival and quality of life of HIV-1-infected patients. However, interruption of therapy almost invariably leads to the re-emergence of detectable viral replication because HIV-1 persists in viral latent reservoirs. Improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in HIV-1 latency has paved the way for innovative strategies that attempt to purge latent virus. In this article we discuss the results of the broadly explored 'shock and kill' strategy, and also highlight the major hurdles facing this approach. Finally, we present recent innovative works suggesting that locking out latent proviruses could be a potential alternative therapeutic strategy.

PMID:
28073694
DOI:
10.1016/j.it.2016.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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