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Biomed Res Int. 2016;2016:5862586. doi: 10.1155/2016/5862586. Epub 2016 Dec 14.

Custom-Made Synthetic Scaffolds for Bone Reconstruction: A Retrospective, Multicenter Clinical Study on 15 Patients.

Author information

1
Private Practice, 00193 Rome, Italy.
2
Department of Surgical and Morphological Science, Dental School, Insubria University, 21100 Varese, Italy.
3
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Federico II University, 80131 Naples, Italy.
4
Department of Dental Sciences, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, 20132 Milan, Italy.

Abstract

Purpose. To present a computer-assisted-design/computer-assisted-manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technique for the design, fabrication, and clinical application of custom-made synthetic scaffolds, for alveolar ridge augmentation. Methods. The CAD/CAM procedure consisted of (1) virtual planning/design of the custom-made scaffold; (2) milling of the scaffold into the exact size/shape from a preformed synthetic bone block; (3) reconstructive surgery. The main clinical/radiographic outcomes were vertical/horizontal bone gain, any biological complication, and implant survival. Results. Fifteen patients were selected who had been treated with a custom-made synthetic scaffold for ridge augmentation. The scaffolds closely matched the shape of the defects: this reduced the operation time and contributed to good healing. A few patients experienced biological complications, such as pain/swelling (2/15: 13.3%) and exposure of the scaffold (3/15: 20.0%); one of these had infection and complete graft loss. In all other patients, 8 months after reconstruction, a well-integrated newly formed bone was clinically available, and the radiographic evaluation revealed a mean vertical and horizontal bone gain of 2.1 ± 0.9 mm and 3.0 ± 1.0 mm, respectively. Fourteen implants were placed and restored with single crowns. The implant survival rate was 100%. Conclusions. Although positive outcomes have been found with custom-made synthetic scaffolds in alveolar ridge augmentation, further studies are needed to validate this technique.

PMID:
28070512
PMCID:
PMC5192311
DOI:
10.1155/2016/5862586
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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