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Accid Anal Prev. 2017 Feb;99(Pt A):372-378. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2016.12.016. Epub 2017 Jan 6.

Measuring a conceptual model of the relationship between compulsive cell phone use, in-vehicle cell phone use, and motor vehicle crash.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, 408 E. Chestnut Ave, Suite 610, Louisville, KY 40202, United States. Electronic address: stephen.oconnor@louisville.edu.
2
Department of Psychological Sciences, Western Kentucky University, 3074 Gary Ransdell Hall, 1906 College Heights Blvd., Bowling Green, KY, 42101, United States.
3
Department of Health Promotion and Policy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Arnold House, 715 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003, United States.
4
Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, Patricia Bracelin Steel Memorial Building, 401 Broadway, 4th floor, Seattle, WA 98122, United States; Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific St., Health Sciences Building, Seattle, WA 98195, United States; Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development, Seattle Children's Hospital, 2001 Eighth Ave., Suite 400, Seattle, WA 98121, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Previous research suggests that anticipation of incoming phone calls or messages and impulsivity are significantly associated with motor vehicle crash. We took a more explanative approach to investigate a conceptual model regarding the direct and indirect effect of compulsive cell phone use and impulsive personality traits on crash risk.

METHODS:

We recruited a sample of 307 undergraduate college students to complete an online survey that included measures of cell phone use, impulsivity, and history of motor vehicle crash. Using a structural equation model, we examined the direct and indirect relationships between factors of the Cell Phone Overuse Scale-II (CPOS-II), impulsivity, in-vehicle phone use, and severity and frequency of previous motor vehicle crash. Self-reported miles driven per week and year in college were included as covariates in the model.

RESULTS:

Our findings suggest that anticipation of incoming communication has a direct association with greater in-vehicle phone use, but was not directly or indirectly associated with increasing risk of previous motor vehicle crash. Of the three latent factors comprising the CPOS-II, only anticipation was significantly associated with elevated cell phone use while driving. Greater impulsivity and use of in-vehicle cell phone use while driving were directly and significantly associated with greater risk of motor vehicle crash.

CONCLUSIONS:

Anticipation of incoming cellular contacts (calls or texts) is associated with greater in-vehicle phone use, while greater in-vehicle cell phone use and impulsive traits are associated with elevated risk of motor vehicle crashes.

KEYWORDS:

Accident risk; Cell phone use; Distracted driving; Motor vehicle crashes

PMID:
28068624
DOI:
10.1016/j.aap.2016.12.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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