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Nutrients. 2017 Jan 6;9(1). pii: E42. doi: 10.3390/nu9010042.

Marine Oil Supplements for Arthritis Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

Author information

1
Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. ninnaks@hotmail.com.
2
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, 1958 FC Copenhagen, Denmark. ninnaks@hotmail.com.
3
Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. sabrina.mai.nielsen@regionh.dk.
4
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, 1958 FC Copenhagen, Denmark. sabrina.mai.nielsen@regionh.dk.
5
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, 1958 FC Copenhagen, Denmark. jra@nexs.ku.dk.
6
Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. henning.bliddal@regionh.dk.
7
Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. simon.tarp@regionh.dk.
8
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, 1958 FC Copenhagen, Denmark. ll@nexs.ku.dk.
9
Division of Rheumatology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. defurst@mednet.ucla.edu.
10
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. msalmazor@mdanderson.org.
11
Musculoskeletal Group, Cochrane Collaboration, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L6, Canada. lyddiatt@lyddiatt.ca.
12
Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. robin.christensen@regionh.dk.

Abstract

Arthritis patients often take fish oil supplements to alleviate symptoms, but limited evidence exists regarding their efficacy. The objective was to evaluate whether marine oil supplements reduce pain and/or improve other clinical outcomes in patients with arthritis. Six databases were searched systematically (24 February 2015). We included randomized trials of oral supplements of all marine oils compared with a control in arthritis patients. The internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and heterogeneity was explored using restricted maximum of likelihood (REML)-based meta-regression analysis. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to rate the overall quality of the evidence. Forty-two trials were included; 30 trials reported complete data on pain. The standardized mean difference (SMD) suggested a favorable effect (-0.24; 95% confidence interval, CI, -0.42 to -0.07; heterogeneity, I² = 63%. A significant effect was found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (22 trials; -0.21; 95% CI, -0.42 to -0.004) and other or mixed diagnoses (3 trials; -0.63; 95% CI, -1.20 to -0.06), but not in osteoarthritis patients (5 trials; -0.17; 95% CI, -0.57-0.24). The evidence for using marine oil to alleviate pain in arthritis patients was overall of low quality, but of moderate quality in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

KEYWORDS:

arthritis; complementary medicine; fish oil; joint pain; marine oil; meta-analysis; randomized controlled trials; rheumatology

PMID:
28067815
PMCID:
PMC5295086
DOI:
10.3390/nu9010042
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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