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Toxicol In Vitro. 2017 Dec;45(Pt 3):417-425. doi: 10.1016/j.tiv.2016.12.015. Epub 2017 Jan 5.

Comparison of cellular and transcriptomic effects between electronic cigarette vapor and cigarette smoke in human bronchial epithelial cells.

Author information

1
Univ. Lille, CHU Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, EA 4483, IMPECS - IMPact of Environmental ChemicalS on human health, F-59000 Lille, France. Electronic address: sebastien.antherieu@univ-lille2.fr.
2
Univ. Lille, CHU Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, EA 4483, IMPECS - IMPact of Environmental ChemicalS on human health, F-59000 Lille, France.
3
Univ. Lille, CHU Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, EA 4483, IMPECS - IMPact of Environmental ChemicalS on human health, F-59000 Lille, France; Mines Douai, SAGE, F-59508 Douai, France.

Abstract

The use of electronic cigarette (e-cig) can be considered as an alternative to smoking. However, due to a lack of thorough toxicological studies, absolute safety of these products cannot be guaranteed. The aim of this in vitro work was to investigate the potential toxicity of e-vapors generated by a smoking machine in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells cultured at air-liquid interface, in comparison to cigarette smoke (CS). Although CS decreased strongly cell viability from 48min exposure, e-vapors induced no cytotoxicity up to 288min exposure. Moreover, oxidative stress was evidenced only after exposure to CS, with a decrease secretion of GRO-ɑ from 8min and of IL-8 and MCP-1 after 48min exposure. Only a low increase of IL-6 secretion was measured in cells exposed to e-vapors. Finally, transcriptomic data of exposed cells indicated that a large number of genes were deregulated in response to CS, especially genes involved in important biological functions as oxidative stress and cell death, while e-vapors elicited very discrete modulation. These results strongly suggest a lower toxicity of e-vapors compared to CS in the BEAS-2B cell line and constitute a baseline for further experimental studies with a larger spectrum of e-liquids and e-cig models.

KEYWORDS:

BEAS-2B cell line; E-cigarette; Toxicity; Transcriptomic; Vapors

PMID:
28065790
DOI:
10.1016/j.tiv.2016.12.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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