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Infect Genet Evol. 2017 Apr;49:97-103. doi: 10.1016/j.meegid.2017.01.003. Epub 2017 Jan 4.

Diversity in VP3, NSP3, and NSP4 of rotavirus B detected from Japanese cattle.

Author information

1
Ishikawa Prefectural Livestock Research Center, Hodatsushimizu, Ishikawa 929-1325, Japan.
2
Ishikawa Hokubu Livestock Hygiene Service Center, Nanao, Ishikawa 929-2126, Japan.
3
Research and Education Center for Prevention of Global Infectious Disease of Animal, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan.
4
Department of Bioproduction Science, Ishikawa Prefectural University, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8836, Japan.
5
Department of Health and Medical Sciences, Ishikawa Prefectural Nursing University, Kahoku, Ishikawa 929-1210, Japan.
6
Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Musashimurayama, Tokyo 208-0011, Japan; Laboratory of Viral Infection I, Kitasato Institute for Life Sciences, Graduate School of Infection Control Sciences, Minato, Tokyo 108-8641, Japan.
7
Faculty of Veterinary Science, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, Musashino, Tokyo 180-8602, Japan.
8
Research and Education Center for Prevention of Global Infectious Disease of Animal, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan; Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan.
9
Research and Education Center for Prevention of Global Infectious Disease of Animal, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan; Department of Bioproduction Science, Ishikawa Prefectural University, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8836, Japan. Electronic address: m-nagai@ishikawa-pu.ac.jp.

Abstract

Bovine rotavirus B (RVB) is an etiological agent of diarrhea mostly in adult cattle. Currently, a few sequences of viral protein (VP)1, 2, 4, 6, and 7 and nonstructural protein (NSP)1, 2, and 5 of bovine RVB are available in the DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank databases, and none have been reported for VP3, NSP3, and NSP4. In order to fill this gap in the genetic characterization of bovine RVB strains, we used a metagenomics approach and sequenced and analyzed the complete coding sequences (CDS) of VP3, NSP3, and NSP4 genes, as well as the partial or complete CDS of other genes of RVBs detected from Japanese cattle. VP3, NSP3, and NSP4 of bovine RVBs shared low nucleotide sequence identities (63.3-64.9% for VP3, 65.9-68.2% for NSP3, and 52.6-56.2% for NSP4) with those of murine, human, and porcine RVBs, suggesting that bovine RVBs belong to a novel genotype. Furthermore, significantly low amino acid sequence identities were observed for NSP4 (36.1-39.3%) between bovine RVBs and the RVBs of other species. In contrast, hydrophobic plot analysis of NSP4 revealed profiles similar to those of RVBs of other species and rotavirus A (RVA) strains. Phylogenetic analyses of all gene segments revealed that bovine RVB strains formed a cluster that branched distantly from other RVBs. These results suggest that bovine RVBs have evolved independently from other RVBs but in a similar manner to other rotaviruses. These findings provide insights into the evolution and diversity of RVB strains.

KEYWORDS:

Bovine rotavirus B; Genetic characterization; Japan; Metagenomics approach; Novel genotype

PMID:
28063924
DOI:
10.1016/j.meegid.2017.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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