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Addict Behav. 2017 Apr;67:86-91. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.12.013. Epub 2016 Dec 26.

Racial/ethnic differences in electronic cigarette knowledge, social norms, and risk perceptions among current and former smokers.

Author information

1
University of Miami, Department of Psychology, PO Box 248185, Coral Gables, FL, United States; University of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1120 NW 14th Street, Miami, FL, United States. Electronic address: monica.hooper@case.edu.
2
University of Miami, Department of Psychology, PO Box 248185, Coral Gables, FL, United States. Electronic address: skolar@med.miami.edu.

Abstract

Psychosocial factors that may affect electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) initiation or maintenance among racial/ethnic minorities are not well-understood. This study examined racial/ethnic differences in e-cigarette knowledge, risk perceptions, and social norms among current and former smokers. Individuals with a tobacco smoking history and an awareness of e-cigarettes (N=285) were recruited from the community from June to August 2014. Telephone-administered surveys assessed demographics, smoking status, and e-cigarette knowledge, risk perceptions, and normative beliefs. Analyses of covariance and multinomial logistic regression tested associations by race/ethnicity. Controlling for sociodemographics and smoking status, White participants scored significantly higher on e-cigarette knowledge, compared to both Hispanics and African Americans/Blacks. Knowledge was lower among African Americans/Blacks compared to Hispanics. Compared to both Whites and Hispanics, African American/Black participants held lower perceptions regarding e-cigarette health risks and were less likely to view e-cigarettes as addictive. Normative beliefs did not differ by race/ethnicity. In conclusion, e-cigarette knowledge, health risk perceptions, and perceived addictiveness differed by race/ethnicity. The variation in e-cigarette knowledge and beliefs among smokers and former smokers has implications for use, and potentially, dual use. Understanding these relationships in unrepresented populations can inform future research and practice.

KEYWORDS:

E-cigarette; Knowledge; Race/ethnicity; Risk perceptions; Smoking

PMID:
28063324
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.12.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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