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Alzheimers Dement. 2017 Mar;13(3):312-321. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2016.12.005. Epub 2017 Jan 5.

Current issues and future research priorities for health economic modelling across the full continuum of Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Quantify Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: anders.gustavsson@quantifyresearch.com.
2
University of Exeter Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
3
RICE-The Research Institute for the Care of Older People, Royal United Hospital, Bath, UK.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
5
Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland.
6
Quantify Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Limited, Camberley, UK.
8
Novartis Healthcare Private Limited, Hyderabad, India.
9
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Available data and models for the health-economic evaluation of treatment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have limitations causing uncertainty to decision makers. Forthcoming treatment strategies in preclinical or early AD warrant an update on the challenges associated with their economic evaluation. The perspectives of the co-authors were complemented with a targeted review of literature discussing methodological issues and data gaps in AD health-economic modelling. The methods and data available to translate treatment efficacy in early disease into long-term outcomes of relevance to policy makers and payers are limited. Current long-term large-scale data accurately representing the continuous, multifaceted, and heterogeneous disease process are missing. The potential effect of disease-modifying treatment on key long-term outcomes such as institutionalization and death is uncertain but may have great effect on cost-effectiveness. Future research should give priority to collaborative efforts to access better data on the natural progression of AD and its association with key long-term outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Cost-effectiveness; Dementia; Disease modification; Disease progression; Economic evaluation; Health care decision making; Modelling; Outcomes; Preclinical

PMID:
28063281
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2016.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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