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BMC Gastroenterol. 2017 Jan 7;17(1):6. doi: 10.1186/s12876-016-0558-5.

High serum resistin associates with intrahepatic inflammation and necrosis: an index of disease severity for patients with chronic HBV infection.

Author information

1
Department of Infectious Diseases, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, China.
2
Institute of Biomedicine, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, China.
3
Institute of Wudang Chinese Medicine, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, China.
4
Department of Infectious Diseases, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Zhangzhidong Road. 99, 430060, Wuhan, China.
5
Department of Neurology, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, South Renmin Road. 32, 442000, Shiyan, Hubei, China. luojie_001@126.com.
6
Department of Infectious Diseases, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Zhangzhidong Road. 99, 430060, Wuhan, China. zjgong@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies have revealed that resistin plays a role as an intrahepatic cytokine with proinflammatory activities. This study investigated the association between serum resistin and fibrosis severity and the possible marker role of resistin in the inflammatory process of chronic hepatitis B.

METHODS:

In this study, 234 subjects with HBV infection were retrospectively selected, including 85 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 70 patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis (LC-B), and 79 patients with HBV-related liver failure (LF-B). Serum levels of resistin, IL-1, IL-6, IL-17, IL-23, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 were assayed by ELISA. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were extracted from clinical databases of Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, including serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (TBil), and liver stiffness (LS).

RESULTS:

All the selected patients with HBV infection showed significantly increased levels of serum resistin, which was rarely detectable in the healthy controls. Serum resistin levels in patients with CHB, LC-B, and LF-B were 4.119 ± 5.848 ng/mL, 6.370 ± 6.834 ng/mL, and 6.512 ± 6.076 ng/mL, respectively. Compared with the CHB group, patients with LC-B or LF-B presented with significantly higher serum levels of resistin (p < 0.01). On the other hand, all of the enrolled patients had high serum levels of IL-1, IL-6, IL-17, TNF-α, and TGF-β1, but not IL-23. Interestingly, serum levels of resistin was significantly positively correlated with serum levels of TGF-β1 in LC-B patients (R = 0.3090, p = 0.0290), with IL-17 in LC-B (R = 0.4022, p = 0.0038) and LF-B patients (R = 0.5466, p < 0.0001), and with AST (R = 0.4501, p = 0.0036) and LS (R = 0.3415, p = 0.0310) in CHB patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

High serum resistin associates with intrahepatic inflammation and necrosis and may be used as an index of disease severity for patients with chronic HBV infection.

KEYWORDS:

Hepatitis B; Liver cirrhosis; Liver failure; Proinflammatory cytokines; Resistin

PMID:
28061755
PMCID:
PMC5219659
DOI:
10.1186/s12876-016-0558-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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