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Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:115-119. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2016.12.031. Epub 2017 Jan 3.

Fine particulate air pollution and premature ventricular contractions: The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: wesley.oneal@emory.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, Section on Cardiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; Epidemiological Cardiology Research Center (EPICARE), Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
3
Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, East Carolina Heart Institute, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
5
Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is unknown if higher levels of ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure increase the risk for premature ventricular contractions (PVC) in a population-based study of men and women, and if this relationship varies by race or sex.

METHODS:

We examined the association of PM <2.5µm in diameter (PM2.5) concentration with PVCs in 26,121 (mean age=64±9.3 years; 55% female; 41% black) participants from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study. Estimates of short- (2-week) and long-term (1-year) PM2.5 exposures were computed prior to the baseline visit using geographic information system data on the individual level at the coordinates of study participants' residences. PVCs were identified from baseline electrocardiograms.

RESULTS:

PVCs were detected in 1719 (6.6%) study participants. Short- (OR=1.08, 95%CI=1.03, 1.14) and long- (OR=1.06, 95%CI=1.01, 1.12) term PM2.5 exposures were associated with PVCs. Interactions were not detected by race or sex. An interaction between short-term PM2.5 exposure and PVCs was detected for those with cardiovascular disease (OR=1.16, 95%CI=1.06, 1.27) compared with those without cardiovascular disease (OR=1.05, 95%CI=0.99, 1.12; p-interaction=0.027).

CONCLUSION:

Our findings suggest that PM2.5 exposure is associated with an increased risk for PVCs in a biracial population-based study of men and women. We also have identified persons with cardiovascular disease as an at-risk population for PVCs when increases in short-term PM2.5 concentration occur.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Particulate matter; Ventricular ectopy

PMID:
28061370
PMCID:
PMC5354125
DOI:
10.1016/j.envres.2016.12.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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