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Lasers Med Sci. 2017 Feb;32(2):419-428. doi: 10.1007/s10103-016-2138-x. Epub 2017 Jan 4.

Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy on pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, and SF-MPQ indexes of women with myofascial pain.

Author information

1
Psychobiology Graduate Program, School of Philosophy, Science and Literature of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, 14040-901, SP, Brazil.
2
Department of Restorative Dentistry of Dentistry School of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, 14040-904, SP, Brazil.
3
Department of Morphology, Physiology and Basic Pathology of Dentistry School of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, 14040-904, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.
4
Psychobiology Graduate Program, School of Philosophy, Science and Literature of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, 14040-901, SP, Brazil. christie@forp.usp.br.
5
Department of Morphology, Physiology and Basic Pathology of Dentistry School of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, 14040-904, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. christie@forp.usp.br.

Abstract

Women with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) frequently report pain areas in body regions. This process is associated with central sensitization phenomena, present in chronic pain. The low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been reported as a therapeutic option for the painful TMD treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of LLLT on pain intensity (visual analogue scale, VAS), pain sensitivity in orofacial and corporal points (pressure pain threshold, PPT), and on Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) indexes of women with myofascial pain (subtype of muscle TMD). Ninety-one women (18-60 years) were included in the study, among which 61 were diagnosed with myofascial pain (Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorder-Ia and Ib) and were divided into laser (n = 31) and placebo group (n = 30), and 30 were controls. The LLLT was applied at pre-established points, twice a week, eight sessions (780 nm; masseter and anterior temporal = 5 J/cm2, 20 mW, 10 s; TMJ area = 7.5 J/cm2, 30 mW, 10 s). Pain intensity, pain sensitivity, and the SF-MPQ indexes were measured at the baseline, during laser sessions, and 30 days after treatment. For intra-group comparisons, the Friedman test was performed, and for inter-group, the Mann-Whitney test. Increased pain sensitivity was found in women with myofascial pain when compared to controls (p < 0.05). There was a reduction in pain intensity for both groups after LLLT. The LLLT did not change the PPT for any group (p > 0.05). Active laser and placebo reduced the indexes of sensory, total pain, and VAS, maintaining the results after 30 days; there was a reduction in the affective pain rating index for both groups, with no maintenance after 30 days for placebo, and the present pain intensity decreased in the laser group and did not change in the placebo after LLLT. In conclusion, the LLLT active or placebo are effective in reducing the overall subjective perception of myofascial pain (VAS and SF-MPQ indexes); however, they have no effectiveness in reducing the pain sensitivity in orofacial and corporal points (PPT increase).

KEYWORDS:

Low-level laser therapy; Myofascial pain syndromes; Pain measurement; Temporomandibular joint disorders

PMID:
28054261
DOI:
10.1007/s10103-016-2138-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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