Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetologia. 2017 May;60(5):830-835. doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4193-z. Epub 2017 Jan 4.

Prolonged sitting may increase diabetes risk in physically inactive individuals: an 11 year follow-up of the HUNT Study, Norway.

Author information

1
HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Forskningsveien 2, N-7600, Levanger, Norway. bjorn.o.asvold@ntnu.no.
2
Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. bjorn.o.asvold@ntnu.no.
3
HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Forskningsveien 2, N-7600, Levanger, Norway.
4
School of Public Health, Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

We examined the association between sitting time and diabetes incidence, overall and by strata of leisure-time physical activity and BMI.

METHODS:

We followed 28,051 adult participants of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a population-based study, for diabetes incidence from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 and estimated HRs of any diabetes by categories of self-reported total daily sitting time at baseline.

RESULTS:

Of 28,051 participants, 1253 (4.5%) developed diabetes during 11 years of follow-up. Overall, sitting ≥8 h/day was associated with a 17% (95% CI 2, 34) higher risk of developing diabetes compared with sitting ≤4 h/day, adjusted for age, sex and education. However, the association was attenuated to a non-significant 9% (95% CI -5, 26) increase in risk after adjustment for leisure-time physical activity and BMI. The association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by leisure-time physical activity (p Interaction = 0.01). Among participants with low leisure-time physical activity (≤2 h light activity per week and no vigorous activity), sitting 5-7 h/day and ≥8 h/day were associated with a 26% (95% CI 2, 57) and 30% (95% CI 5, 61) higher risk of diabetes, respectively, compared with sitting ≤4 h/day. There was no corresponding association among participants with high leisure-time physical activity (≥3 h light activity or >0 h vigorous activity per week). There was no statistical evidence that the association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by obesity (p Interaction = 0.65).

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:

Our findings suggest that total sitting time has little association with diabetes risk in the population as a whole, but prolonged sitting may contribute to an increased diabetes risk among physically inactive people.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Sedentary lifestyle; Type 2 diabetes mellitus

PMID:
28054097
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-016-4193-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center