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Sci Rep. 2017 Jan 4;7:40009. doi: 10.1038/srep40009.

Serum uric acid levels are associated with obesity but not cardio-cerebrovascular events in Chinese inpatients with type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital; Shanghai Clinical Center for Diabetes; Shanghai Diabetes Institute; Shanghai Key Laboratory. of Diabetes Mellitus; Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease; 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233, China.
2
Department of VIP, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital; 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233, China.

Abstract

We aim to explore the associations between serum uric acid (SUA) and obesity and cardio-cerebrovascular events (CCEs) in Chinese inpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). 2 962 inpatients with T2DM were stratified into quartile based on SUA concentrations. There were significant increases in the prevalence of both obesity (32.6%, 41.9%, 50.1%, and 62.8%, respectively, p < 0.001 for trend) and severe obesity (0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%, and 1.3%, respectively, p < 0.001 for trend) across the SUA quartiles. A fully adjusted multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that SUA quartiles were independently associated with the presence of obesity (p < 0.001). The prevalence of CCEs was significantly higher in the obese diabetics than in the nonobese diabetics (16.8% vs. 13.2%, p = 0.027). After controlling for multiple confounding factors, BMI levels were also significantly correlated with the presence of CCEs (p = 0.020). However, there was no significant association of SUA quartiles/SUA levels with the presence of CCEs in T2DM. This study suggested that SUA levels were independently associated with obesity but not with CCEs in patients with T2DM. In selected populations such as subjects with T2DM, the role of uric acid in cardiovascular complications might be attributable to other cardiovascular risk factors, such as obesity.

PMID:
28051185
PMCID:
PMC5209679
DOI:
10.1038/srep40009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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