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J Affect Disord. 2017 Mar 1;210:189-195. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.12.040. Epub 2016 Dec 27.

International development and psychometric properties of the Child and Adolescent Trauma Screen (CATS).

Author information

1
University of Ulm, Clinic for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychotherapy, Germany. Electronic address: cedric.sachser@uniklinik-ulm.de.
2
Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress, Seattle, United States. Electronic address: lucyb@u.washington.edu.
3
Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, Norway; Mental & Physical health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Electronic address: tonje.holt@nkvts.no.
4
Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, Norway; University of Oslo, Department of Psychology, United States. Electronic address: tine.jensen@psykologi.uio.no.
5
Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress, Seattle, United States. Electronic address: jungbn@uw.edu.
6
Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, USA. Electronic address: Elizabeth-Risch@ouhsc.edu.
7
Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Department of Psychology, Eichstätt, Germany. Electronic address: rita.rosner@ku.de.
8
University of Ulm, Clinic for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychotherapy, Germany. Electronic address: lutz.goldbeck@uniklinik-ulm.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Systematic screening is a powerful means by which children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) can be detected. Reliable and valid measures based on current diagnostic criteria are needed.

AIM:

To investigate the internal consistency and construct validity of the Child and Adolescent Trauma Screen (CATS) in three samples of trauma-exposed children in the US (self-reports: n=249; caregiver reports: n=267; pre-school n=190), in Germany (self-reports: n=117; caregiver reports: n=95) and in Norway (self-reports: n=109; caregiver reports: n=62).

METHOD:

Internal consistency was calculated using Cronbach's α. Convergent-discriminant validity was investigated using bivariate correlation coefficients with measures of depression, anxiety and externalizing symptoms. CFA was used to investigate the DSM-5 factor structure.

RESULTS:

In all three language samples the 20 item symptom score of the self-report and the caregiver report proved good to excellent reliability with α ranging between .88 and .94. The convergent-discriminant validity pattern showed medium to strong correlations with measures of depression (r =.62-.82) and anxiety (r =.40-.77) and low to medium correlations with externalizing symptoms (r =-.15-.43) within informants in all language versions. Using CFA the underlying DSM-5 factor structure with four symptom clusters (re-experiencing, avoidance, negative alterations in mood and cognitions, hyperarousal) was supported (n =475 for self-report; n =424 for caregiver reports).

LIMITATIONS:

The external validation of the CATS with a DSM-5 based semi-structured clinical interview and corresponding determination of cut-points is pending.

CONCLUSION:

The CATS has satisfactory psychometric properties. Clinicians may consider the CATS as a screening tool and for symptom monitoring.

KEYWORDS:

Children and adolescents; PTSD; Questionnaire; Screening; Traumatic events

PMID:
28049104
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2016.12.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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