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Clin Nutr. 2018 Apr;37(2):752-754. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2016.12.016. Epub 2016 Dec 27.

The relationship between muscle protein content and CT-derived muscle radio-density in patients with upper GI cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA, Scotland, UK. Electronic address: mramage@exseed.ed.ac.uk.
2
Department of Clinical Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA, Scotland, UK. Electronic address: neiljohns@doctors.org.uk.
3
Department of Clinical Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA, Scotland, UK. Electronic address: chris.deans@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk.
4
Department of Clinical Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA, Scotland, UK. Electronic address: j.a.ross@ed.ac.uk.
5
Stable Isotope Biochemistry Laboratory, Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, Rankine Avenue, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride, Glasgow, G75 0QF, Scotland, UK. Electronic address: tom.preston@glasgow.ac.uk.
6
Department of Clinical Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA, Scotland, UK. Electronic address: richard.skipworth@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk.
7
Musculoskeletal Diseases Area, Muscle Group, Novartis Pharma AG, Novartis Campus, WSJ-152.2.72.04, CH-4056, Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address: carsten.jacobi@novartis.com.
8
Department of Clinical Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA, Scotland, UK.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by skeletal muscle loss. Cross-sectional analysis of CT scans is a recognized research method for assessing skeletal muscle volume. However, little is known about the relationship between CT-derived estimates of muscle radio-density (SMD) and muscle protein content. We assessed the relationship between CT-derived body composition variables and the protein content of muscle biopsies from cancer patients.

METHODS:

Rectus abdominis biopsies from cancer patients (n = 32) were analysed for protein content and correlated with phenotypic data gathered using CT body composition software.

RESULTS:

Skeletal muscle protein content varied widely between patients (median μg/mg wet weight = 89.3, range 70-141). There was a weak positive correlation between muscle protein content and SMD (r = 0.406, p = 0.021), and a weak positive correlation between protein content and percentage weight change (r = 0.416, p = 0.018).

CONCLUSION:

The protein content of skeletal muscle varies widely in cancer patients and cannot be accurately predicted by CT-derived muscle radio-density.

KEYWORDS:

Body composition; Cachexia; Cancer; Imaging analysis; Protein content; Skeletal muscle

PMID:
28041627
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2016.12.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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