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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Feb;24(6):5679-5689. doi: 10.1007/s11356-016-8316-3. Epub 2016 Dec 30.

Estimation of students' exposure to metal concentrations from river-dust episodes during 1994-2012.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, College of Health Care and Management, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China, 40242.
2
State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian Province, 361102, People's Republic of China.
3
Key Laboratory of Health Technology Assessment of Fujian Province University, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian Province, 361102, People's Republic of China.
4
Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China, 40402.
5
Health Technology Center, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China, 40242.
6
School of Public Health, College of Health Care and Management, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China, 40242. kcy@csmu.edu.tw.
7
Health Technology Center, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China, 40242. kcy@csmu.edu.tw.
8
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China, 40242. kcy@csmu.edu.tw.
9
Department of Public Health, College of Health Care and Management, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110 Chien-Kuo N Rd., Sec. 1, Taichung, Taiwan, 40242. kcy@csmu.edu.tw.

Abstract

Two elementary schools (Shiuguang and Fongrong) from Yulin County in Taiwan, near a main area of potential exposure to Aeolian river-dust, were selected to collect outdoor and indoor PM10 aerosols and to measure five metals in PM10 (As, Ni, Cr, Cd, and Mn). Significant relationships (p < 0.01) were found between outdoor PM10 concentrations at Lunbei's air quality monitoring station and the two elementary schools. The outdoor PM10 concentrations at the monitoring station and the schools' indoor PM10 concentrations also showed significant correlations. This study also established a relationship between the outdoor and indoor concentrations of PM10 and metals in the schools. Estimations were made regarding students' 8 h of exposure to metal concentrations from river-dust episodes during 1994-2012, based on correlation equations that were shown to be statistically significant.

KEYWORDS:

Aerosols (PM10); Exposure concentrations; Metals; River-dust episodes

PMID:
28039631
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-016-8316-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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