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World Neurosurg. 2017 Mar;99:448-456. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2016.12.061. Epub 2016 Dec 28.

Assessment of Cognitive, Emotional, and Motor Domains in Patients with Diffuse Gliomas Using the National Institutes of Health Toolbox Battery.

Author information

1
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. Electronic address: stefan.t.lang@gmail.com.
2
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
3
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Seaman Family MR Research Centre, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada.
4
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Seaman Family MR Research Centre, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada.
5
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Seaman Family MR Research Centre, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada; Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
6
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Patients with brain tumors are known to have deficits in cognitive, motor, and emotional domains. Comprehensive evaluation of the patient with brain tumor includes taking into account all these domains at baseline and throughout treatment. Standard neuropsychological assessment methods, however, are lengthy, expensive, and often are variable. The authors appraised the feasibility of using a brief, inexpensive, comprehensive, and standardized neuropsychological battery, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Toolbox, to assess these domains in patients with diffuse glioma.

METHODS:

Eighteen patients were recruited and completed the NIH Toolbox Cognitive Battery, 2 motor tests (Grip Strength and Grooved Pegboard), and the NIH Toolbox Emotional Battery. Fully corrected T scores are reported, as well as composite scores of fluid and crystallized cognition. Follow-up cognitive (n = 13) and motor assessment (n = 12) were performed at 1 month after surgery.

RESULTS:

The total time to complete the battery was approximately 60 minutes. A total of 78% of patients demonstrated significant impairment on one or more cognitive test, whereas 37% had impaired fluid cognition. Crystallized and overall composite cognitive scores were relatively intact, with 16% of patients showing significant impairment. A total of 22% of patients had impaired strength in the left hand, and 22% had impaired dexterity in both hands. In addition, 50% of patients showed impairment in one or more emotional domain. At 1 month after surgery, a significant decrease in crystallized cognition was observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

The NIH Toolbox represents a feasible alternative to current neuropsychological batteries in the assessment of neurosurgical patients. It can be administered quickly, inexpensively, and will give the neurosurgical community a common currency when reporting neuropsychological results.

KEYWORDS:

Brain tumor; Cognition; Glioma; Neuropsychology

PMID:
28039096
DOI:
10.1016/j.wneu.2016.12.061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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