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Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Feb;105(2):503-512. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.116.136861. Epub 2016 Dec 28.

Associations of dietary, lifestyle, and sociodemographic factors with iron status in Chinese adults: a cross-sectional study in the China Health and Nutrition Survey.

Author information

1
Cornell University College of Human Ecology, Ithaca, NY.
2
Departments of Nutrition and.
3
Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and.
4
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
5
Departments of Nutrition and dow471@mail.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although a high prevalence of anemia and related disease burden have been documented in China, limited evidence is available on the current population-level iron status and risk factors for iron imbalance.

OBJECTIVE:

We explored the associations of dietary, lifestyle, and sociodemographic factors with iron status in Chinese adults.

DESIGN:

Our study population consisted of 7672 adults aged 18-65 y from the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey. Diet was assessed with the use of 3 consecutive 24-h dietary recalls. Serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, and hemoglobin concentrations were measured.

RESULTS:

The geometric means ± SDs for ferritin concentrations were 135.9 ± 2.7 ng/mL in men and 42.7 ± 3.1 ng/mL in women. After adjustment for potential risk factors, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration, the association between age and ferritin concentration was inverse in men (P-trend < 0.001) and positive in women (P-trend < 0.001). We observed a positive association between body mass index (in kg/m2) and ferritin concentration in both men and women (both P-trends < 0.001). Dietary phytate intake was inversely associated with ferritin concentration in men (P-trend = 0.002) but not in women. Red meat consumption was positively associated with ferritin concentration both in men (P-trend = 0.002) and in older women (P-trend = 0.009). Lower intakes of grains and higher intakes of pork and poultry were associated with higher ferritin concentrations (all P-trends ≤ 0.05) in men but not in women. We observed variations in ferritin concentrations across different geographic regions (both P ≤ 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Serum ferritin concentrations varied across different sociodemographic, lifestyle, and dietary factors in this Chinese population. A higher intake of red meat was associated with higher ferritin concentrations in men and older women.

KEYWORDS:

China; anemia; diet; ferritin; iron stores; lifestyle

PMID:
28031193
PMCID:
PMC6546221
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.116.136861
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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