Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2016 Dec 23;23(4):537-541. doi: 10.5604/12321966.1226842.

Cardiovascular system diseases in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome - the role of inflammation process in this pathology and possibility of early diagnosis and prevention.

Author information

1
Department of Gynecology, Endocrinology and Gynecological Oncology, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland.

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome is a disorder which affects 5-10% of women in reproductive age. PCOS is a cause of hyperandrogenism, menstrual disorders and infertility. The most common clinical symptoms are hirsutism, acne and obesity. Patients often suffer from metabolic disorders: insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, dislipidemia, leading to atherosclerosis and others irregularities of the metabolic syndrome. Patients are in the high risk group for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) development because of the metabolic abnormalities. Obesity is observed in 35-60% of women with PCOS. Lean women with PCOS are also exposed to a greater risk of glucose intolerance development and abnormalities in lipid profile than women without PCOS with comparable BMI. Adipocytes are the source of many compounds of the paracrine and endocrine activity. Some of them are also markers and mediators of inflammation. Increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines in blood can promote atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Markers: IL-18, TNF, IL-6 and hs-CRP are often elevated in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. An increase in inflammatory markers may be an early indicator of the risk of developing insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, and may become a useful prognostic and therapeutic tool for monitoring patients with PCOS: lean and those with overweight and obesity. Assessment of the concentrations of inflammatory markers may become a very useful test in evaluating the risk of developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, long before their clinical manifestation. It will also allow for the appropriate prophylaxis.

PMID:
28030919
DOI:
10.5604/12321966.1226842
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Institute of Rural Health
Loading ...
Support Center